Custom Search

Search My Download Corner

Sunday, March 8, 2009

Bios Update

BIOS,computer's Basic Input-Output System is embedded software on a motherboard that will control attached hardware. The BIOS itself is typically an EEPROM, or Electronically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory, that is programmed with "firmware" and has the ability to save small amounts of information specific to user configurations. BIOS components are often soldered to the motherboard and therefore not serviceable by the user. Still some of these can be inserted into a socket, allowing its replacement.(Contact the manufacturer of your BIOS chip to find out if an updated chip is available, and if that chip will fit into the same slot on your motherboard.
) All BIOS components are serviceable via a firmware upgrade that is known as "flashing" this process is called "updating the BIOS".

Flashing [also known as upgrading] your bios should be the last resort to solve a problem. Most people flash to gain the use of larger hard drives although recently, many are flashing to get all the features of XP to work. Other people have to upgrade their bios just to get XP to work properly with some specific hardware.

It is recommended as a last resort to perform a BIOS update as a flash gone bad will make your pc unusable if the backup doesn't work. In the event of a critical failure. System builders and motherboard manufacturers will often repair systems and motherboards that failed to take a BIOS update, provided they are still under warranty. If using BIOS update software executed from Windows or another operating system, backup the existing BIOS image first with UniFlash (Universal Flasher)created by Pascal Van Leeuwen and Galkowski Adam which supports a wide range of chipsets and Flash ROMs licensed under GNU GPL v2. Some BIOS update software versions have this functionality built-in (e.g., "Save" or "Backup"), and will advise you to perform a backup first.

Suppose you have a used 80 gig drive and desire to resuse and your old PC which can't detect it . This is the best, and most common reason to flash. On the other hand, if you have a more modern pc that cant see lets say a 180 gig drive and but all else is working properly then you may want to consider a PCI hard drive controller card which has an onboard bios that will see your new large hard drive and also come with 2 more IDE channels you can use in addition to the 2 channels you already have. This is safer than flashing the bios.

Not all BIOS updates are necessary, but for the hardware enthusiast, obtaining the latest BIOS may equate to better performance. If you decide to flash make sure the updated bios addresses the issue you are trying to solve.

Some motherboards can be updated by executing a program from the operating system level after booting from the hard disk. In other cases the system must be booted from a floppy disk; CD or USB thumb drive (using software supplied by the system or motherboard vendor). Some manufacturers will use their own custom application to update the BIOS, others will use a third party utility to update the BIOS while booted from the legacy DOS operating system. The latter may be split into two different files, or bundled together as a CD or floppy image with an extracting application. Download the appropriate updating software and BIOS from your manufacturer's website. In most cases these are free. Identify your MotherBoard Maker with
1] SIW - System Information for Windows free.
2] BIOSAgentPlus. It provides free Bios scan.
3] CTBIOS 1.5 May Identify Your MotherBoard Maker
MBID 1.4 ID Your AMI Bios Or Other Motherboard
HW iNFO 4.8 ID's Video And Sound Cards, More
If you dont have a 1.44 drive you used this utility to flash from a CD or USB which you can add the new bios and flash utility to and then burn it.


View blog reactions

2 comments:

nancy said...

I recently came accross your blog and have been reading along. I thought I would leave my first comment. I dont know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.


Betty

http://desktopmemory.info

festiva said...

Thank you for your kind comment. I shall try harder to keep up to your expectation.

Regards,
festiva

Post a Comment